Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: Administrator, Curator, or Staffcpmcdill [Webbed Hand] Date: Apr 1, 2005 1:33pm
Forum: netlabels Subject: Re: How do people promote their Net Releases?

I have certainly encountered that prejudice sometimes, that if something is non-commercial it is because it is not good enough to be commercial.

While admittedly mp3.com was totally self-published music, which made it more hit-n-miss, I'd like to think that the heads of netlabels generally hold certain standards, in terms of content and quality, and just like with commercial labels, it's on the basis of these standards that netlabels build their reputations.

It's a pity that some people do make sweeping dismissals of the whole scene, but then it's easier to condemn something than to take some time to understand it.

But there may be a "sour-grapes" aspect as well. Outside of various flavors of electronica, most music genres are under-represented or entirely absent.

Netlabels may find more credibility in the world at large when there is better representation of genres, and more works by women and other-than-caucasian recording artists. The very artists that the commercial recording industry has been dissing most should be finding a real refuge and forum in the netlabel scene.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Micht Date: Apr 1, 2005 2:37pm
Forum: netlabels Subject: Re: How do people promote their Net Releases?

Rather then the intolerable fact that everything here is FREE, personally I've had to come over my own prejudices about the "(im)materiality" of the music itself, and "accept" the fact that at best there are covers you have to download and make yourself, and that more often then not there isn't any cover art to begin with. People are more used to listening to CD's and records than music.

"Netlabels may find more credibility in the world at large when there is better representation of genres, and more works by women and other-than-caucasian recording artists."

Genres: Probably there could be some extension beyond the limits of electronics or noise possible in the future; but then the whole netlabel concept worked with these genres because the label link of the chain was always important in the first place, it's a rather typical thing for techno/electronica. In other genres people don't look so much at who put it out and label esthetics and what have you, so I'm not sure whether you could one day see, say, a Jazz netlabel (there's a surprising dearth of improvised music around here, that said).

Women: I'll admit I have never looked at the problem myself (guess what, I'm a guy), is the proportion actually lower then average?

"other-than-Caucasian": I've found things from South America, Eastern Europe, Japan, Australia around here so, regardless of strict racial considerations, I think that scene is remarquably diverse already. But then, of course I'd welcome more non-Western artists!

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Administrator, Curator, or Staffgrant kidd [numia/slskrex] Date: Apr 4, 2005 2:29pm
Forum: netlabels Subject: Re: How do people promote their Net Releases?

the big difference between netlabels and mp3.com --- though both offering free, and sometimes good music -- is that netlabels are organized and thus reliable whereas free sites like debox, iuma, and the old mp3.com have no real point of reference.

Imagine downloading and liking 5 kikapu releases. You're pretty sure that if you download the rest of the 50+ releases you'll probably like what you hear. mp3.com on the other hand had no representative label to guide the musicians. They only had loosely-applied genres to support them, and many times the genres WERE loosely applied.

This is where netlabels are strongest. We have a community, and in a sense we are our own genre. It's that appeal that differentiates us from the likes of mp3.com and iuma. It's also the difference between our music and the music on archive's 'open source audio' catalogue.

Promoting yourself as a netlabel isn't difficult, really. There's a whole network of places designed for (or at least accomidating to) netlabels that want to promote their releases. Phlow's netlabel catalogue has a list of those (netlabels.phlow.de).

If you want print media try doing short-run pressings of your CD and make them look pretty good. Get permission from the artist to sell some of them locally to pay back the costs and distribute the rest to media. If you can get some hype online and play on the radio, a bit of persistance with the print media might show some results. I remember soulseek records went ball-out to press release the first 1mm and ended up getting a review on wire magazine... which is pretty cool. (i wish i had the copy :/)

Of course I'm willing to talk about this all day (it's my thesis topic), but that's my two pence.

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)